SSRI drugs and increased Non-Hodgkins lymphoma

SSRI drugs and increased Non-Hodgkins lymphoma

from Ann Blake Tracy:

“These serotonergic drugs produce all types of cancers. Perhaps the older tricyclics are more prone to produce this type, but they all cause various types of cancers. The research has been out there for years.

 

For years I would call and cancer deaths and learn that they were indeed on an antidepressant before their cancer appeared. One of the very first ladies I worked with got cancer from Prozac and knew that was where it came from. Her last request to me was that I try to help her son who was also on the drugs. When I called a few months later to follow up with him I was told that he had just come through what used to be her office at the medical examiner for the state of Utah.

 

I asked how he was doing when they saw him. And her friend said, “No, you don’t understand. He CAME THROUGH our office.”

 

Of course in shock I replied, “You don’t mean as a corpse?!!”

 

She said, “Yes”

 

I asked if the cause of death was suicide.

 

She said, “No, they said he died of natural causes.”

 

I said, “Wait a minute! How old was he?! Wasn’t he young?”

 

She said, “Yes. He was in his early 40’s.”

 

My reply was, “And they actually told you that at 41 he died of ‘Natural Causes’?”

 

She said, “That was my thought exactly.”

 

People need to learn more about how very toxic these chemicals are. Look at what this article goes on to say about the various chemicals thought to cause this – solvents, pesticides, nitrates in water, agricultural exposure to insecticides, herbicides, and fumigants. Yet patients who take these drugs are volunteering to ingest these chemicals in antidepressants without realizing what they are putting into their bodies.

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These researchers determined the incidence of NHL in 43,932 users of any antidepressant medication in North Jutland, Denmark, from 1989 through 2003. They reported that the use of tricyclic antidepressants was associated with an overall 53% increased incidence of NHL compared with nonuse. The risk was higher in users who had >10 prescriptions and more than five years of follow-up (IRR=2.50). The use of other types of antidepressants did not increase the risk of developing NHL.”

 

http://professional.cancerconsultants.com/oncology_main_news.aspx?id=42253

Cancer News Article
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Tricyclic Antidepressants May Increase the Incidence of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Researchers from Denmark reported that patients who are long-term takers of tricyclic antidepressant medications have a 53% increased incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).1 These data were also published in the July issue of Epidemiology.2 

The incidence of NHL has been increasing over the past several decades. The reasons for this increase are unknown. In fact, the causes of most lymphomas are unknown, except for the relatively few that are associated with specific bacteria (Helicobacter pylori in gastric lymphoma) or with viruses, such as the Epstein-Barr virus (Burkitt’s lymphoma) as well as HIV-related lymphomas, body cavity lymphomas (human herpes virus-8) or T-cell lymphoma (HTLV-1). However, none of these specific causes explain the increased incidence of lymphomas observed in recent years. There is speculation that exposure to chemicals, such as certain solvents, pesticides, herbicides, and water contaminated with nitrate, is responsible for the increased incidence of NHL. A recent report suggests that agricultural exposure to insecticides, herbicides, and fumigants was associated with an increased incidence of t(14;18)-positive but not t(14;18)-negative non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) (see related news). Another report suggests that occupational exposure to solvents, such as benzene, xylene, and toluene, may increase the risk of developing NHL and Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

These researchers determined the incidence of NHL in 43,932 users of any antidepressant medication in North Jutland, Denmark, from 1989 through 2003. They reported that the use of tricyclic antidepressants was associated with an overall 53% increased incidence of NHL compared with nonuse. The risk was higher in users who had >10 prescriptions and more than five years of follow-up (IRR=2.50). The use of other types of antidepressants did not increase the risk of developing NHL.

Comments: These are very interesting results and if confirmed with other studies, would warrant investigation into the mechanism of this effect.

Related News:

Occupational Solvents May Increase Risk of Lymphoma (10/5/2006)

Agricultural Pesticide Use Associated with Risk of t(14;18)-Positive NHL (5/16/2006)

Cigarette Smoking in Women Increases Risk for Follicular Lymphoma (11/26/2003)

Infectious Mononucleosis is Associated with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in Young Adults (10/7/2003)

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from Ann Blake Tracy: “These serotonergic drugs produce all types of cancers. Perhaps the older tricyclics are more prone to produce this type, but they all cause various types of cancers. The research has been out there for years.   For years I would call and cancer deaths and learn that they were indeed on…
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