Black Cumin Seed as ANTI-FUNGAL and ANTI-BACTERIAL

Black Cumin Seed as ANTI-FUNGAL and ANTI-BACTERIAL

Dr. Weeks’ Comment:  Its well know anti-inflammatory benefit aside, and its specific anti-cancer properties aside, we now understand that black cumin seed is anti-fungal and anti-bacterial 

(thanks Marty!) 

 

 

1.
Pak J Biol Sci. 2011 Dec 1;14(23):1038-46.

Influence of Nigella sativa fixed oil on some blood parameters and histopathology of skin in staphylococcal-infected BALB/c mice.

Abstract

Nigella sativa has been used for a long time in Jordanian folk medicine to treat skin diseases like microbial infections and inflammation. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the healing efficacy of petroleum ether extract of Nigella sativa seeds (fixed oil) on staphylococcal-infected skin. Male BALB/c mice were infected with 100 microL of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538) suspension at a dose of 10(8) colony forming unit/mouse into shaved mild dorsal skin. Application of treatments for each group (100 microL sterile saline, 100 microL chloramphenicol (10 microg/mouse) and Nigella sativa fixed oil at a dose of 50, 100 or 150 microL/mouse) was performed at the site of infection twice a day for two consecutive days after 3 h of infection. At day 3 and 5 after infection, total White Blood Cells (WBCs) count; differential and absolute differential WBC counts and the number of viable bacteria present in the skin area were measured. At day 5 after infection, the animals were sacrificed and the histology of skin was examined. Results indicated that fixed oil of Nigella sativa seeds enhance healing of staphylococcal-infected skin by reducing total and absolute differential WBC counts, local infection and inflammation, bacterial expansion and tissue impairment. These effects provide scientific basis for the use of Nigella sativa in traditional medicine to treat skin infections and inflammations.

PMID:

 22590837

[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

2.
Plant Physiol Biochem. 2011 Feb;49(2):131-7. doi: 10.1016/j.plaphy.2010.10.008. Epub 2010 Nov 18.

Novel antifungal defensins from Nigella sativa L. seeds.

Abstract

From seeds of Nigella sativa L. (Ranunculaceae), an endemic plant of Uzbekistan, two novel defensins named Ns-D1 and Ns-D2, were isolated and sequenced. The peptides differ by a single amino acid residue and show high sequence similarity to Raphanus sativus L. defensins Rs-AFP1 and Rs-AFP2. The Ns-D1 and Ns-D2 defensins display strong although divergent antifungal activity towards a number of phytopathogenic fungi. High antifungal activity of N. sativa defensins makes them promising candidates for engineering pathogen-resistant plants.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

PMID:

 21144761

[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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3.
Saudi J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jul-Sep;16(3):207-14. doi: 10.4103/1319-3767.65201.

Comparative study of Nigella Sativa and triple therapy in eradication of Helicobacter Pylori in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIM:

A large number of diseases are ascribed to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), particularly chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Successful treatment of H. pylori infection with antimicrobial agents can lead to regression of H. pylori-associated disorders. Antibiotic resistance against H. pylori is increasing, and it is necessary to find new effective agents. Nigella sativa seed (NS), a commonly used herb, possesses in vitro anti-helicobacter activity. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of NS in eradication of H. pylori infection in non-ulcer dyspeptic patients.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The study was conducted on 88 adult patients attending King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, from 2007 to 2008, with dyspeptic symptoms and found positive for H. pylori infection by histopathology and urease test. Patients were randomly assigned to four groups, receiving i) triple therapy (TT) comprising of clarithromycin, amoxicillin, omeprazole [n= 23], ii) 1 g NS + 40 mg omeprazole (OM) [n= 21], iii) 2 g NS + OM [n= 21] or iv) 3 g NS + OM [n= 23]. Negative H. pylori stool antigen test four weeks after end of treatment was considered as eradication.

RESULTS:

H. pylori eradication was 82.6, 47.6, 66.7 and 47.8% with TT, 1 g NS, 2 g NS and 3 g NS, respectively. Eradication rates with 2 g NS and TT were statistically not different from each other, whereas H. pylori eradication with other doses was significantly less than that with TT (P < 0.05). Dyspepsia symptoms improved in all groups to a similar extent.

CONCLUSIONS:

N. sativa seeds possess clinically useful anti-H. pylori activity, comparable to triple therapy. Further clinical studies combining N. sativa with antibiotics are suggested.

PMID:

 20616418

[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] PMCID:

PMC3003218

 

Free PMC Article

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4.
Glycoconj J. 2010 Apr;27(3):329-48. doi: 10.1007/s10719-010-9281-6. Epub 2010 Mar 6.

Thymoquinone from nutraceutical black cumin oil activates Neu4 sialidase in live macrophage, dendritic, and normal and type I sialidosis human fibroblast cells via GPCR Galphai proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

Abstract

Anti-inflammatory activities of thymoquinone (TQ) have been demonstrated in in vitro and in vivo studies. However, the precise mechanism(s) of TQ in these anti-inflammatory activities is not well understood. Using a newly developed assay to detect sialidase activity in live macrophage cells (Glycoconj J doi: 10.1007/s10719-009-9239-8 ), here we show that TQ has no inhibitory effect on endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced sialidase activity in live BMC-2 macrophage cells. In contrast, the parent black seed oil (BSO) and another constituent of BSO para-cymene (p-CY) completely block LPS induced sialidase activity. All of these compounds had no effect on cell viability. On the other hand, TQ induces a vigorous sialidase activity in live BMC-2 macrophage cells in a dose dependent manner as well in live DC-2.4 dendritic cells, HEK-TLR4/MD2, HEK293, SP1 mammary adenocarcinoma cells, human WT and 1140F01 and WG0544 type I sialidosis fibroblast cells. Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate) inhibits TQ-induced sialidase activity in live BMC-2 cells with an IC(50) of 0.0194 microM compared to an IC(50) of 19.1 microM for neuraminidase inhibitor DANA (2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid). Anti-Neu1, -2 and -3 antibodies have no inhibition of TQ-induced sialidase activity in live BMC-2 and human THP-1 macrophage cells but anti-Neu4 antibodies completely block this activity. There is a vigorous sialidase activity associated with TQ treated live primary bone marrow (BM) macrophage cells derived from WT and hypomorphic cathepsin A mice with a secondary Neu1 deficiency (NeuI KD), but not from Neu4 knockout (Neu4 KO) mice. Pertussis toxin (PTX), a specific inhibitor of Galphai proteins of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and the broad range inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) galardin and piperazine applied to live BMC-2, THP-1 and primary BM macrophage cells completely block TQ-induced sialidase activity. These same inhibitory effects are not observed with the GM1 ganglioside specific cholera toxin subunit B (CTXB) as well as with CTX, tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a, and the broad range GPCR inhibitor suramin. The specific inhibitor of MMP-9, anti-MMP-9 antibody and anti-Neu4 antibody, but not the specific inhibitor of MMP-3 completely block TQ-induced sialidase activity in live THP-1 cells, which express Neu4 and MMP-9 on the cell surface. Neu4 sialidase activity in cell lysates from TQ-treated live THP-1 cells desialylates natural gangliosides and mucin substrates. RT-PCR and western blot analyses reveal no correlation between mRNA and protein values for Neu3 and Neu4 in human monocytic THP-1 cells, suggesting for the first time a varied post-transcriptional mechanism for these two mammalian sialidases independent of TQ activation. Our findings establish an unprecedented activation of Neu4 sialidase on the cell surface by thymoquinone, which is derived from the nutraceutical black cumin oil. The potentiation of GPCR-signaling by TQ via membrane targeting of Galphai subunit proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activation may be involved in the activation process of Neu4 sialidase on the cell surface.

PMID:

 20213245

[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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5.
J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad. 2008 Jul-Sep;20(3):72-4.

Anti bacterial activity of Nigella sativa against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be one of the commonest pathogens encountered in clinical as well as laboratory practice. It has become a major health problem worldwide. Newer antimicrobials/agents are urgently needed to combat this problem MRSA resistance to various anti-staphylococcal agents. In the back-drop of this difficult situation Nigella sativa commonly known as black seed (ethanolic extract) was aimed at to evaluate if it had any anti-staphylococcal activity.

METHODS:

The extract was prepared by reflux extraction method. Disc diffusion and in agar dilution methods were performed to assess the antibacterial activity. Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 was used as the standard reference strain.

RESULTS:

All tested strains of MRSA were sensitive to N. sativa extract at a concentration of 4 mg/disc while the extract had an MIC range of 0.2-0.5 mg/ml.

CONCLUSION:

The results indicated that N. sativa has inhibitory effect on MRSA. This finding warrants necessity of further investigation of this product of folk medicine.

PMID:

 19610522

[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

6.
J Med Food. 2009 Apr;12(2):408-15. doi: 10.1089/jmf.2007.0600.

Evaluation of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of seed extracts from six Nigella species.

Abstract

Seed extracts from six species of the genus Nigella (Family Ranunculaceae)-Nigella arvensis, Nigelladamascena, Nigella hispanica, Nigella nigellastrum, Nigella orientalis, and Nigella sativa-obtained by successive extraction with n-hexane, chloroform, and methanol, were tested for their antimicrobial activity against 10 strains of pathogenic bacteria and yeast using the microdilution method as well as for anti-inflammatory properties by in vitro cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 assay. Chemical characterization of active extracts was carried out including free and fixed fatty acid analysis. Comparison of antimicrobial activity showed that N. arvensis chloroform extract was the most potent among all species tested, inhibiting Gram-positive bacterial and yeast strains with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 0.25 to 1 mg/mL. With the exception of selective inhibitory action of n-hexane extract of N. orientalis on growth of Bacteroides fragilis (MIC = 0.5 mg/mL), we observed no antimicrobial activity for other Nigella species. Anti-inflammatory screening revealed that N. sativa, N. orientalis, N. hispanica, N. arvensis n-hexane, and N. hispanica chloroform extracts had strong inhibitory activity (more than 80%) on COX-1 and N. orientalis, N. arvensis, and N. hispanica n-hexane extracts were most effective against COX-2, when the concentration of extracts was 100 microg/mL in both COX assays. In conclusion, N. arvensis, N. orientalis, and N. hispanicaseeds, for the first time examined for antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects, revealed their significant activity in one or both assays.

PMID:

 19459745

[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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7.
Phytother Res. 1999 Nov;13(7):616-8.

Antimicrobial screening of some Indian spices.

Abstract

In India, spices have been traditionally used since ancient times, for the preservation of food products as they have been reported to have antiseptic and disinfectant properties. In this respect, a preliminary screening for antimicrobial activities of 35 different Indian spices has been carried out. Of the spices surveyed, the results indicate that clove, cinnamon, bishop’s weed, chilli, horse raddish, cumin, tamarind, black cumin, pomegranateseeds, nutmeg, garlic, onion, tejpat, celery, cambodge, have potent antimicrobial activities against the test organisms Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633), Escherichia coli (ATCC 10536) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ATCC 9763). The results also establish the traditional use of spices as food preservatives, disinfectants and antiseptics.

Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID:

 10548758

[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Icon for John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
8.
J Ethnopharmacol. 1991 Sep;34(2-3):275-8.

Studies on the antimicrobial activity of Nigella sativa seed (black cumin).

Abstract

Filter paper discs impregnated with the diethyl ether extract of Nigella sativa seeds (25-400 micrograms extract/disc) caused concentration-dependent inhibition of Gram-positive bacteria represented by Staphylococcus aureus. Gram-negative bacteria represented by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli (but not Salmonella typhimurium) and a pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. The extract showed antibacterial synergism with streptomycin and gentamicin and showed additive antibacterial action with spectinomycin, erythromycin, tobramycin, doxycycline, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, lincomycin and sulphamethoxyzole-trimethoprim combination. The extract successfully eradicated a non-fatal subcutaneous staphylococcal infection in mice when injected at the site of infection.

PMID:

 1795532

[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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