BVT for HPV

BVT for HPV

 

Toxins (Basel). 2014 Aug; 6(8): 2210–2228. 
Published online 2014 Jul 25. doi:  10.3390/toxins6082210

Cancer Cell Growth Inhibitory Effect of Bee Venom via Increase of Death Receptor 3 Expression and Inactivation of NF-kappa B in NSCLC Cells

Abstract

Our previous findings have demonstrated that bee venom (BV) has anti-cancer activity in several cancer cells. However, the effects of BV on lung cancer cell growth have not been reported. Cell viability was determined with trypan blue uptake, soft agar formation as well as DAPI and TUNEL assay. Cell death related protein expression was determined with Western blotting. An EMSA was used for nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) activity assay. BV (1–5 μg/mL) inhibited growth of lung cancer cells by induction of apoptosis in a dose dependent manner in lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of DR3 and DR6 was significantly increased. However, deletion of DRs by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV induced cell growth inhibitory effects. Expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (caspase-3 and Bax) was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited. A combination treatment of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, docetaxel and cisplatin, with BV synergistically inhibited both A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cell growth with further down regulation of NF-κB activity. These results show that BV induces apoptotic cell death in lung cancer cells through the enhancement of DR3 expression and inhibition of NF-κB pathway

Conclusions

In this study, we indicated that natural toxin BV could be useful as an anti-cancer agent through the overexpression of DR3 and inactivation of NF-κB for the treatment of lung cancer cells and drug resistant cancer cells. Expression of pro-apoptotic proteins were concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity was inhibited. This study suggested that BV induces apoptotic cell death in lung cancer cells through the enhancement of DR3 expression and inhibition of the NF-κB pathway.

Scientists Use Bees to Sting HPV Tumors; The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD) Reviews a Study

Painful, yet effective, bee venom (BV) treatments resulted in a significant suppression of cancerous cell growth in HPV 16-infected cells, according to a study published in the journal, Oncology Reports on January 28, 2015.

Bee venom treatments against HPV can be painful. “The live bee is held (with tweezers or some other small instrument) by the person administering the bee venom, who then places the bee on the part of the patient’s body to be treated. (2)

Rochester, NY (PRWEB) February 03, 2015

New research shows that bee venom may work as a treatment against certain strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV). Dr. Yong-Wan Kim and colleagues wrote in a study that “BV treatments (bee venom treatments) resulted in a more significant suppression of cell growth in HPV 16-infected cells.” (1) Dr. Kim is from the College of Medicine at The Catholic University of Korea in Seoul, Republic of Korea. Additionally, “the mRNA expression (RNA molecules that convey genetic information) and (viral) protein levels of HPV16 … were significantly decreased by BV.” (1) In other words, scientists found that bee venom worked to noticeably reduce HPV16’s ability to transfer genetic information to cells, and also limited the virus’s ability to make viral proteins. This resulted in “restricting tumor growth in vivo (tested in live animals) and were much more effective on the suppression of tumor growth.” (1)

However, bee venom treatments against HPV can be painful. “The live bee is held (with tweezers or some other small instrument) by the person administering the bee venom, who then places the bee on the part of the patient’s body to be treated, at which point the bee reflexively stings. Depending on the condition, the treatment schedule can vary. The venom can also be given via a syringe, rather than directly from the bee.” (See bidmc.org, Last reviewed June 2013 by Michael Woods, MD) (2)

“The medicinal use of bee venom apparently dates back to ancient Egypt and is reported in the history of Europe and Asia. Hippocrates used bee venom to treat joint pain and arthritis. In more modern times, interest in the effects of bee venom was renewed in 1888 with the publication of a clinical study conducted in Europe on its effect on rheumatism. Since then, interest in bee venom treatment has ebbed and flowed.” (2)

“There are numerous conditions that bee venom has been proposed to treat, such as: chronic injuries, such as bursitis and tendonitis, hay fever, removal of scar tissue, gout, shingles, (and) burns.” (2) As evidenced above, scientists are now interested in exploring the effects of bee venom against the human papillomavirus.

The CDC notes that “HPV may … be passed on during oral sex and genital-to-genital contact. HPV can be passed on between straight and same-sex partners-even when the infected partner has no signs or symptoms.” (See the CDC’s Website, last updated on February 5, 2013) (4).

Are there other treatments available against the HPV?

“There are no drugs approved against the HPV. Current treatments include procedures, such as cryotherapy, conization, and the Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP). These procedures use liquid nitrogen, a surgical knife (scalpel), a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser, or electrical current to remove the abnormal growths caused by the HPV. These growths include cells that harbor the active virus. The procedures do not target cells with the latent virus. Since they do not remove the latent virus, these procedures only produce a temporary remission.” (3) In contrast, Novirin and Gene-Eden-VIR were designed to target the latent HPV and are completely pain free.

 

Reference:

(1) Yong-Wan Kim Pankaj Kumar Chaturvedi Sung Nam Chun Yang Gu Lee Woong Shick Ahn “Honeybee venom possesses anticancer and antiviral effects by differential inhibition of HPV E6 and E7 expression on cervical cancer cell line.” Oncology Reports, Published online on: Wednesday, January 28, 2015.
http://www.spandidos-publications.com/10.3892/or.2015.3760 

(2) Alan, R. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center – Medicinal Uses of Bee Venom. Last reviewed June 2013 by Michael Woods, MD.
http://www.bidmc.org/YourHealth/ConditionsAZ/HPV.aspx?ChunkID=13504 

(3) Polansky, H. Itzkovitz, E. Gene-Eden-VIR Is Antiviral: Results of a Post Marketing Clinical Study. Published in September 2013.
http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=36101#.U-s9ouOSz90

(4) CDC – Human Papillomavirus (HPV) – What is HPV? Last updated on February 5, 2013.
http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/whatishpv.html

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  Toxins (Basel). 2014 Aug; 6(8): 2210–2228.  Published online 2014 Jul 25. doi:  10.3390/toxins6082210 Cancer Cell Growth Inhibitory Effect of Bee Venom via Increase of Death Receptor 3 Expression and Inactivation of NF-kappa B in NSCLC Cells Kyung Eun Choi,1 Abstract Our previous findings have demonstrated that bee venom (BV) has anti-cancer activity in several cancer cells.…
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