Sunday, 23 July 2017

Seed Husks are the Treasure

Seed Husks are the Treasure

Dr. Weeks’ Comment:  Here in North America we have a new record holder – 800 year old seeds that were able to sprout and yield squash.  Dateline 1963: The seeds of a date palm tree, which had been extinct for 1800 years, were discovered at the fortress Masada in Israel. These 2000 year old seeds were planted in 2005 and sprouted and great a date palm tree which intern was able to reproduce itself.  Wow!  But the current record holder is the Silene stenophylla whose 32,000 year old seeds were discovered buried 124 feet under Siberian permafrost and these seed too sprouted.  (see this LINK   at minute 18 or slides 26 and 27) 

So what force on earth is strong and persistent enough to protect the fragile ingredients of a seed – the brittle DNA and RNA and the easily rancidified oil content of the seed for hundreds of years?  THE HUSK.  Yes, the husk is where the guardian angels of the seed reside – the bioflavonoids and the anti-oxidant chemicals which guard the precious seed content from air and temperature and moisture fluctuations.  And what does modern food industry do with the seed husk? They toss it in the waste bin!  Only the seed oil – as extracted seed oils – is valued and when you drink an extracted seed oil you are drinking husk-less, easily oxidized oils. BAD.  Much better were you and your loves ones to drink the whole crushed seed – Drink SOUL and CORE and eat the whole crushed seed protein powder FORM.  Those three will change your life!

 

800-Year-Old Seeds Have Grown Into A History-Altering Plant

In 2008, on a dig in the First Nation’s Menominee Reservation in Wisconsin, archaeologists made a small but stunning discovery: a tiny clay pot.

Though it might not have seemed very impressive at first glimpse, this little piece of pottery was determined to be about 800 years old.

And inside that pot? Something that changes how we’re looking at extinction, preservation, and food storage, as well as how humans have influenced the planet in their time on it.

It’s amazing to think that a little clay pot buried in the ground 800 years ago would still be relevant today, but it’s true! But maybe that’s not so surprising.

After all, the choices people made in centuries past continue to affect us today, even down to which continent we live on.

And not only that, it’s actually brought an extinct species of squash that was presumed to be lost forever. Read on to discover more!

 

This pot was unearthed on the Menominee Reservation in Wisconsin, where it had laid buried for the past 800 years.

This pot was unearthed on the Menominee Reservation in Wisconsin, where it had laid buried for the past 800 years.

Inside, archaeologists found a stash of seeds. The seeds were probably buried in the pot as a method of storing food supplies. They were determined to be an old, now-extinct species of squash.

Inside, archaeologists found a stash of seeds. The seeds were probably buried in the pot as a method of storing food supplies. They were determined to be an old, now-extinct species of squash.

Now, seven years after making this stunning discovery, students in Winnipeg decided to plant the 800-year-old seeds — and, to everyone’s amazement, something grew!

Now, seven years after making this stunning discovery, students in Winnipeg decided to plant the 800-year-old seeds — and, to everyone's amazement, something grew!

 

 

The squash was named Gete-okosomin. It means “Big Old Squash” in the Menominee language — and big it certainly is!

The squash was named Gete-okosomin. It means "Big Old Squash" in the Menominee language — and big it certainly is!

Now, they’re working to cultivate the squash so that it doesn’t go extinct — again.

Now, they're working to cultivate the squash so that it doesn't go extinct — again.

It may be just a humble squash, but it’s also a symbol of First Nations’ community and history, as well as a fascinating look into how amazing plants can be.

It may be just a humble squash, but it's also a symbol of First Nations' community and history, as well as a fascinating look into how amazing plants can be.

It just goes to show you that plants can be pretty incredible — and that sometimes, history has a funny way of coming back around.

If you love history, science, or you’re just curious about what this would taste like in soup, please SHARE!

`  Get your whole, crushed, organic, non-GMO seeds in a delicious drink here!

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The information contained on these web pages is derived from Dr. Weeks’ years of clinical experience and his review of scientific literature. However, these ideas and information are for your education and entertainment only. They are positively not intended to be a substitute for careful medical evaluation and treatment by a competent, licensed personal health care professional. Dr. Weeks and his associates do not recommend changing any current medications or adding any new therapies without personally consulting a fully qualified physician. Dr. Weeks and his staff specifically disclaim any liability arising directly or indirectly from information contained on these Web pages.

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