Any calorie is NOT a good calorie

Dr. Weeks’ Comment: The disconnect is lethal. The lack of understanding kills.  Go see for your self. At most any conventional oncology clinic the patients are given candy or cookies of baked goods by the very nice staff and no one is thinking of the fact that sugar feeds cancer.  “Any calorie is a good calorie” says the oncologist and this is parroted by the nurse and the cancer dietician.  But what does science say?  Science says that a diet which includes baked goods sweetened by sugar stimulates cancer growth. Any calories is most definitely NOT a good calorie.  

 

Cancer Res. 2016 Jan 1;76(1):24-9. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-14-3432.

A Sucrose-Enriched Diet Promotes Tumorigenesis in Mammary Gland in Part through the 12-Lipoxygenase Pathway.

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies have shown that dietary sugar intake has a significant impact on the development of breast cancer. One proposed mechanism for how sugar impacts cancer development involves inflammation. In the current study, we investigated the impact of dietary sugar on mammary gland tumor development in multiple mouse models, along with mechanisms that may be involved. We found that sucrose intake in mice comparable with levels of Western diets led to increased tumor growth and metastasis, when compared with a nonsugar starch diet. This effect was ascribed in part to increased expression of 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) and its arachidonate metabolite 12-hydroxy-5Z,8Z,10E,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE). We determined that fructose derived from the sucrose was responsible for facilitating lung metastasis and 12-HETE production in breast tumors. Overall, our data suggested that dietary sugar induces 12-LOX signaling to increase risks of breast cancer development and metastasis.

 

Cancer Epidemiol. 2015 Dec;39 Suppl 1:S56-66. doi: 10.1016/j.canep.2014.12.016. Epub 2015 Jul 9.

European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Diet and cancer.

Abstract

Lifestyle factors, including diet, have long been recognised as potentially important determinants of cancer risk. In addition to the significant role diet plays in affecting body fatness, a risk factor for several cancers, experimental studies have indicated that diet may influence the cancer process in several ways. Prospective studies have shown that dietary patterns characterised by higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain foods, and lower intakes of red and processed meats and salt, are related to reduced risks of death and cancer, and that a healthy diet can improve overall survival after diagnosis of breast and colorectal cancers. There is evidence that high intakes of fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of cancers of the aerodigestive tract, and the evidence that dietary fibre protects against colorectal cancer is convincing. Red and processed meats increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Diets rich in high-calorie foods, such as fatty and sugary foods, may lead to increased calorie intake, thereby promoting obesity and leading to an increased risk of cancer. There is some evidence that sugary drinks are related to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Taking this evidence into account, the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends that people have a healthy diet to reduce their risk of cancer: they should eat plenty of whole grains, pulses, vegetables and fruits; limit high-calorie foods (foods high in sugar or fat); avoid sugary drinks and processed meat; and limit red meat and foods high in salt.

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Dr. Weeks’ Comment: The disconnect is lethal. The lack of understanding kills.  Go see for your self. At most any conventional oncology clinic the patients are given candy or cookies of baked goods by the very nice staff and no one is thinking of the fact that sugar feeds cancer.  “Any calorie is a good…
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