Seeds of EDEN and Cancer

Dr. Weeks’ Comment:  PGE2 is a pro-inflammatory prostaglandin which amplifies pain and disease process.  PGE2 is blocked by anti-inflammatory drugs which are COX-2 inhibitors. The problem is, most COX-2 inhibitors are dangerous because they can destroy your liver and kidney and make your stomach bleed out from ulcers and make your ears ring. Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) can kill you, if taken in excess – which is what people in painted to do!   NSAIDs have a narrow therapeutic window meaning the right dose helps but too high a dose can kill. What if there were a safe and powerful anti-inflammatory agent which stops inflammation and is safe? Welcome to  Seeds of Eden.   Seeds of Eden are defined as  organic, non-GMO, finely ground, cold-pressed seeds which are the perfect food and therefore, the perfect medicine. Since all chronic degenerative illnesses, including cancer are driven by inflammation, a safe and effective anti-inflammatory agent is worth its weight in gold.  Black cumin seed has uniquely powerful anti-inflammatory benefits. (Read the abstracts below). Seeds are the treasure chest of Nature and hold tremendous therapeutic potential.  But…  warning!  Too often people settle for toxic seeds which have bio-accumulated herbicides and pesticides. (Reminder: living organisms use their fat/oil tissues to quarantine toxins – so only eat organic seeds and nuts, since these are the fatty tissues of plants!)  Black cumin seed, in particular, is very beneficial but – and this is critically important –  far better than the extracted seed oil which one can buy in a bottle, is the whole crushed seed – just and all because the husk, which is not present in bottles of extracted seed oils, has immune potentiating glycoproteins and minerals. Eat the WHOLE seed – but make certain the seeds are organic and don’t settle for extracted seed oils! Eat the WHOLE seed!

 

Planta Med. 2005 Aug;71(8):739-42.

In vitro inhibitory effects of thymol and quinones of Nigella sativa seeds on cyclooxygenase-1- and -2-catalyzed prostaglandin E2 biosyntheses.

Abstract

Dithymoquinone, thymohydroquinone, thymol and thymoquinone, compounds derived from N. sativa seeds, were investigated for their in vitro anti-inflammatory activities using cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and -2 (COX-2) assays. Our results show that all substances tested possess significant inhibitory activity against at least one COX form at concentrations comparable to the active one of indomethacin. Thymol was the most active against COX-1 with an IC (50) value of 0.2 microM while thymohydroquinone and thymoquinone exhibited the strongest inhibitory effect on COX-2 with IC (50) values of 0.1 and 0.3 microM, respectively. Moreover, dithymoquinone and thymoquinone showed a limited COX-2-specific inhibition.

AND…..

Immunol Lett. 2006 Jul 15;106(1):72-81. Epub 2006 May 22.

Effect of thymoquinone on cyclooxygenase expression and prostaglandin production in a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation.

Abstract

Prostaglandins (PGs) are potent proinflammatory mediators generated through arachidonic acid metabolism by cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and COX-2) in response to different stimuli and play an important role in modulating the inflammatory responses in a number of conditions, including allergic airway inflammation. Thymoquinone (TQ) is the main active constituent of the volatile oil extract of Nigella sativa seeds and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. We examined the effect of TQ on the in vivo production of PGs and lung inflammation in a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. Mice sensitized and challenged through the airways with ovalbumin (OVA) exhibited a significant increase in PGD2 and PGE2 production in the airways. The inflammatory response was characterized by an increase in the inflammatory cell numbers and Th2 cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, lung airway eosinophilia and goblet cell hyperplasia, as well as the induction of COX-2 protein expression in the lung. Intraperitoneal injection of TQ for 5 days before the first OVA challenge attenuated airway inflammation as demonstrated by the significant decrease in Th2 cytokines, lung eosinophilia, and goblet cell hyperplasia. This attenuation of airway inflammation was concomitant to the inhibition of COX-2 protein expression and PGD2 production. However, TQ had a slight inhibitory effect on COX-1 expression and PGE2 production. These findings suggest that TQ has an anti-inflammatory effect during the allergic response in the lung through the inhibition of PGD2 synthesis and Th2-driven immune response.

AND…

Immunol Lett. 2006 Jul 15;106(1):72-81. Epub 2006 May 22.
Effect of thymoquinone on cyclooxygenase expression and prostaglandin production in a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation.
Abstract

Prostaglandins (PGs) are potent proinflammatory mediators generated through arachidonic acid metabolism by cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and COX-2) in response to different stimuli and play an important role in modulating the inflammatory responses in a number of conditions, including allergic airway inflammation. Thymoquinone (TQ) is the main active constituent of the volatile oil extract of Nigella sativa seeds and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. We examined the effect of TQ on the in vivo production of PGs and lung inflammation in a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. Mice sensitized and challenged through the airways with ovalbumin (OVA) exhibited a significant increase in PGD2 and PGE2 production in the airways. The inflammatory response was characterized by an increase in the inflammatory cell numbers and Th2 cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, lung airway eosinophilia and goblet cell hyperplasia, as well as the induction of COX-2 protein expression in the lung. Intraperitoneal injection of TQ for 5 days before the first OVA challenge attenuated airway inflammation as demonstrated by the significant decrease in Th2 cytokines, lung eosinophilia, and goblet cell hyperplasia. This attenuation of airway inflammation was concomitant to the inhibition of COX-2 protein expression and PGD2 production. However, TQ had a slight inhibitory effect on COX-1 expression and PGE2 production. These findings suggest that TQ has an anti-inflammatory effect during the allergic response in the lung through the inhibition of PGD2 synthesis and Th2-driven immune response.

 

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Phytother Res. 2003 Apr;17(4):299-305.

Pharmacological and toxicological properties of Nigella sativa.

Abstract

The seeds of Nigella sativa Linn. (Ranunculaceae), commonly known as black seed or black cumin, are used in folk (herbal) medicine all over the world for the treatment and prevention of a number of diseases and conditions that include asthma, diarrhoea and dyslipidaemia. This article reviews the main reports of the pharmacological and toxicological properties of N. sativa and its constituents. The seeds contain both fixed and essential oils, proteins, alkaloids and saponin. Much of the biological activity of the seeds has been shown to be due to thymoquinone, the major component of the essential oil, but which is also present in the fi ed oil. The pharmacological actions of the crude extracts of the seeds (and some of its active constituents, e.g. volatile oil and thymoquinone) that have been reported include protection against nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity induced by either disease or chemicals. The seeds/oil have antiinflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, antimicrobial and antineoplastic activity. The oil decreases blood pressure and increases respiration. Treatment of rats with the seed extract for up to 12 weeks has been reported to induce changes in the haemogram that include an increase in both the packed cell volume (PCV) and haemoglobin (Hb), and a decrease in plasma concentrations of cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. The seeds are characterized by a very low degree of toxicity. Two cases of contact dermatitis in two individuals have been reported following topical use. Administration of either the seed extract or its oil has been shown not to induce significant adverse effects on liver or kidney functions. It would appear that the beneficial effects of the use of the seeds and thymoquinone might be related to their cytoprotective and antioxidant actions, and to their effect on some mediators of inflammation.

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Int Immunopharmacol. 2005 Dec;5(13-14):1749-70. Epub 2005 Jul 1.
Immunomodulatory and therapeutic properties of the Nigella sativa L. seed.
Abstract

A larger number of medicinal plants and their purified constituents have been shown beneficial therapeutic potentials. Seeds of Nigella sativa, a dicotyledon of the Ranunculaceae family, have been employed for thousands of years as a spice and food preservative. The oil and seedconstituents, in particular thymoquinine (TQ), have shown potential medicinal properties in traditional medicine. In view of the recent literature, this article lists and discusses different immunomodulatory and immunotherapeutic potentials for the crude oil of N. sativa seeds and its active ingredients. The published findings provide clear evidence that both the oil and its active ingredients, in particular TQ, possess reproducible anti-oxidant effects through enhancing the oxidant scavenger system, which as a consequence lead to antitoxic effects induced by several insults. The oil and TQ have shown also potent anti-inflammatory effects on several inflammation-based models including experimental encephalomyelitis, colitis, peritonitis, oedama, and arthritis through suppression of the inflammatory mediators prostaglandins and leukotriens. The oil and certain active ingredients showed beneficial immunomodulatory properties, augmenting the T cell- and natural killer cell-mediated immune responses. Most importantly, both the oil and its active ingredients expressed anti-microbial and anti-tumor properties toward different microbes and cancers. Coupling these beneficial effects with its use in folk medicine, N. sativa seed is a promising source for active ingredients that would be with potential therapeutic modalities in different clinical settings. The efficacy of the active ingredients, however, should be measured by the nature of the disease. Given their potent immunomodulatory effects, further studies are urgently required to explore bystander effects of TQ on the professional antigen presenting cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells, as well as its modulatory effects upon Th1- and Th2-mediated inflammatory immune diseases. Ultimately, results emerging from such studies will substantially improve the immunotherapeutic application of TQ in clinical settings.

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