The Sleep Walking Defence – SSRI toxicity

Sleepwalking claimed by Colo. teen in killing case

May 7th, 2010 @ 12:25pm
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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) – A psychiatrist testified that a Colorado teen was sleepwalking when he allegedly shot and killed his 9-year-old brother and wounded and stabbed his mother.

Dr. John Hardy gave his testimony at an ongoing hearing to decide if Daniel Gudino, 14, of Colorado Springs will become one of the youngest people in the state to be charged as an adult with second-degree murder.

Authorities say Gudino told police he shot his brother and mother in 2009 and later added in a recorded statement, “I was hoping it was just a nightmare.”

In the weeklong hearing that began Monday, Hardy testified that Daniel Gudino was sleepwalking when the shooting occurred.

Hardy said Gudino has parasomnia and thought he was shooting at ghosts.

Hardy interviewed the boy twice and does not believe he had sufficient criminal intent to support murder charges.

“If somebody is in a narcoleptic sleepwalking mode, as rare as that might be, they’re not conscious, even though they can do some fairly complex behavior,” Hardy said.

Prosecutors contend Gudino acted willfully when he picked the lock on a gun cabinet with toothpicks, loaded a .22-caliber rifle, shot his brother in his bed then wounded his mother in the shoulder and stabbed her with a knife and scissors.

Hardy said Gudino gave him a step-by-step account of what happened.

The boy told Hardy he had trouble sleeping, heard noises and was concerned there was a ghost in the house. He left his bed and tried to sleep on a couch, but saw two shadowy figures that scared him before he went to sleep.

“He remembers as in a dream going down to his brother’s room,” Hardy testified. “He remembers shooting the ghost, although he told me he saw blood before he shot.”

Gudino then went to the kitchen.

“The next thing he remembers is his mother crying while wrestling for the scissors,” Hardy said.

Senior Deputy District Attorney Shannon Gerhart asked Hardy how he reconciled his theory about the boy with Gudino’s statement to a detective that he was angry that his brother was allowed to stay home from school.

Gerhart also noted that Daniel Gudino had described trying to kill his mother by shooting her between the eyes.

Hardy said he thought the detective had suggested during the interview that Gudino was angry at his brother.

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Information from: The Gazette, http://www.gazette.com

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Per Ann Blake Tracy:

You had better get use to this defense because you are going to see a lot of it. In fact you have been surrounded by such cases for some time living in Utah – the antidepressant capital of the world. This is called a REM Sleep Behavior Disorder or RBD and 86% of those being diagnosed with it are currently taking an antidepressant. You have heard a lot about Ambien causing this, but that is a drop in the bucket (3% as opposed to 86%) compared to those taking an antidepressant. It is believed that the high levels of serotonin overstimulate the brain stem removing the muscle paralysis during sleep and allowing the patient to get up and act out the nightmare they are having. Tragically the high serotonin levels also produce horrifying nightmares.
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For two decades I have written about this, testified to the FDA about it, done radio, television, newspaper and magazine interviews on the subject. On the first show I ever did on KSL radio with Bob Lee back in 1991 a man called in to talk about a dream he acted out on Prozac only to awake to the shocking realization that it was his wife he had just hit instead of his headboard as he had before. This was enough for him to decide to stop the medication. Others, such as this little boy, are not so lucky as to get a second chance.
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I served as the expert in comedian Phil Hartman’s murder/suicide and RBD is exactly what his wife, Brynn, experienced while under the influence of Zoloft. Pfizer, the makers of Zoloft who were found guilty last week of RICO in marketing another of their drugs, settled the wrongful death case filed against them by the Hartman children for the loss of their parents.
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This is  not only very real and far too common, it is very frightening to learn the science behind it when so many are in potential danger of going into this disorder at any minute while taking an antidepressant. The most common times for this medication reaction is going on or coming off an antidepressant or mixing them with other medications that also affect serotonin. In the past this was known mainly as a drug withdrawal state, but now with 86% of the cases being on an antidepressant, it should help people understand how critical it is to avoid withdrawal of an antidepressant. One must come down off the drugs EXTREMELY SLOWLY to avoid withdrawal.
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Go to the websites below to find thousands of similar cases.
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Dr. Ann Blake Tracy,
Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness

Psychiatrist: Teen thought he was shooting ghosts

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May 06, 2010 1:48 PM
THE GAZETTE

A child psychiatrist testified today that a 13-year-old Colorado Springs boy thought he was shooting at shadowy ghosts in his house on the morning that he killed his brother and wounded their mom.

Dr. John Hardy, a Pueblo psychiatrist said in his opinion Daniel Gudino, now 14, had been sleepwalking during the attacks. Hardy said he believes the youngster suffered from parasomnia, citing another sleepwalking incident about two years ago.

A Stanford University sleep disorder website defines that parasomnia as “disorders that intrude into the sleep process and create disruptive sleep-related events.”

Hardy was called as a defense witness during the fourth day of a week-long hearing to determine whether Gudino should be tried as an adult or a juvenile. Prosecutors are seeking to charge him with second-degree murder and attempted murder in adult court.

Hardy testified that he does not believe Gudino had the sufficient criminal intent to support the charges because the boy was sleepwalking. He interviewed the boy twice since the May 18, 2009, shootings at the family’s home at 1837 Chapel Hills Drive. He also viewed a police interview with Gudino as well as other medical reports.

“If somebody is in a narcoleptic sleepwalking mode – as rare as that might be – they’re not conscious, even though they can do some fairly complex behavior,” Hardy said.

Prosecutors contend that Gudino acted willfully when he picked the lock on a gun cabinet with toothpicks, loaded a .22-caliber rifle, shot to death his 9-year-old brother Ulysses in his bed then shot his mother Marina in the right shoulder and stabbed her with a knife and scissors.

On the witness stand, Hardy said Gudino gave him a step-by-step account of what happened in the house, starting with the night before the shooting.

The family went to bed around 9 p.m. that night. The boy reported having trouble sleeping, heard noises and was concerned there was a ghost in the house. He left his bed and tried to sleep on a couch.

“He saw two shadowy figures that scared him,” Hardy said. “He pulled up the covers and went to sleep.”

“He remembers – as in a dream – going down to his brother’s room…He remembers shooting the ghost, although he told me he saw blood before he shot.”

Then Gudino went upstairs to the kitchen.

“The next thing he remembers is his mother crying while wrestling for the scissors,” Hardy said.

Senior Deputy District Attorney Shannon Gerhart asked Hardy how he reconciled his theory about the boy with what Gudino told a detective on tape: that he was angry at his brother over Ulysses being allowed to stay home from school. She also noted that Daniel Gudino described trying to kill his mother by shooting her between the eyes.

Hardy said he thought that the detective had suggested the idea that Gudino was angry at his brother during the interview.

“One has to be extremely careful in interpreting what Daniel said,” Hardy testified.

“People can create some delusional beliefs when they have these symptoms,” he added. “He (Gudino) might volunteer a motive to try and guess why something may have happened.”

Testimony in the hearing is expected to conclude tomorrow. Fourth Judicial District Judge David Shakes will then decide whether there’s enough evidence to support the charges and whether the case should be transferred to adult court.

For more court coverage, go to the Sidebar blog at Gazette.com

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Sleepwalking claimed by Colo. teen in killing case May 7th, 2010 @ 12:25pm ` COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) – A psychiatrist testified that a Colorado teen was sleepwalking when he allegedly shot and killed his 9-year-old brother and wounded and stabbed his mother. Dr. John Hardy gave his testimony at an ongoing hearing to decide…
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