Memory Loss and Alzheimers? Eat curry.

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Dr. Weeks’ Comment: I have pulled together and presented below the relevant research on curry (tumeric/curcumin) as regards the prevention and treatment of dementia in general and Alzheimer’s disease in particular.
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Why hasn’t your neurologist or geriatric doctor  or memory specialist told you and your parent(s) about curry?    Perhaps because no drug company has (yet) patented the active ingredient of this anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer cellular proliferant herb.
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Scan below and note the top notch publications who have printed this data which never gets shared with the suffering patients.
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Neuroreport. 2010 Nov 30. [Epub ahead of print]

Revisiting dietary antioxidants, neurodegeneration and dementia.

Craggs L, Kalaria RN.

Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK.

Abstract

Epidemiological studies suggest there is marginal benefit that dietary antioxidants reduce risk of Alzheimer type of dementias. Yet cumulative biological evidence indicates oxidative and nitrosative stresses are precursors of neurodegenerative and neurovascular processes. Different dietary flavonoids and polyphenols found in fruits, vegetables, and spices such as curcumin offer neuroprotection through different mechanisms. A study in this volume shows that tetrahydrocurcumin confers protection against amyloid β-induced toxicity by reducing reactive oxygen species and retaining mitochondrial membrane potential. Alzheimer’s disease is a complex disorder. A single target through use of antioxidants may be effective in some but multiple approaches for its control seem to be necessary.

Biomaterials. 2011 Feb;32(6):1635-45. Epub 2010 Dec 4.

Curcumin-decorated nanoliposomes with very high affinity for amyloid-β1-42 peptide.

Mourtas S, Canovi M, Zona C, Aurilia D, Niarakis A, La Ferla B, Salmona M, Nicotra F, Gobbi M, Antimisiaris SG.

Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rio 26510, Patras, Greece.

Abstract

Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates are considered as possible targets for therapy and/or diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD). It has been previously shown that curcumin targets Aβ plaques and interferes with their formation, suggesting a potential role for prevention or treatment of AD. Herein, a click chemistry method was used to generate nanoliposomes decorated with a curcumin derivative, designed to maintain the planar structure required for interaction with Aβ, as directly confirmed by Surface Plasmon Resonance experiments. Another type of liposomes was formed starting from curcumin-phospholipid conjugate, in which the planar structure of curcumin is disrupted. Both types of generated curcumin-decorated vesicles had mean diameters in the nano range (131-207 nm) and slightly negative ζ-potential values according to their lipid composition, and were stable for periods up to 20 days. They also demonstrated high integrity during incubation in presence of plasma proteins. Surface Plasmon Resonance experiments, measuring the binding of flowing liposomes to immobilized Aβ1-42, indicated that the liposomes exposing the curcumin derivative (maintaining the planarity) have extremely high affinity for Aβ1-42 fibrils (1-5 nM), likely because of the occurrence of multivalent interactions, whereas those exposing non-planar curcumin did not bind to Aβ1-42. In summary, we describe here the preparation and characterization of new nanoparticles with a very high affinity for Aβ1-42 fibrils, to be exploited as vectors for the targeted delivery of new diagnostic and therapeutic molecules for AD.

Expert Opin Ther Targets. 2010 Nov;14(11):1177-97.

Novel drug targets based on metallobiology of Alzheimer’s disease.

Bandyopadhyay S, Huang X, Lahiri DK, Rogers JT.

Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Developmental Toxicology, Lucknow, India. sanghmitra@iitr.res.in

Abstract

IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD: Increased localization of Zn, Fe, Cu and Al within the senile plaques (SP) exacerbates amyloid beta (Aβ)-mediated oxidative damage, and acts as catalyst for Aβ aggregation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Thus, disruption of aberrant metal-peptide interactions via chelation therapy holds considerable promise as a rational therapeutic strategy against Alzheimer’s amyloid pathogenesis.

AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: The complexities of metal-induced genesis of SP are reviewed. The recent advances in the molecular mechanism of action of metal chelating agents are discussed with critical assessment of their potential to become drugs.

WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN: Taking into consideration the interaction of metals with the metal-responsive elements on the Alzheimer’s amyloid precursor protein (APP), readers will gain understanding of several points to bear in mind when developing a screening campaign for AD-therapeutics.

TAKE HOME MESSAGE: A functional iron-responsive element (IRE) RNA stem loop in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of the APP transcript regulates neural APP translation. Desferrioxamine, clioquinol, tetrathiolmolybdate, dimercaptopropanol, VK-28, and natural antioxidants, such as curcumin and ginko biloba need critical evaluation as AD therapeutics. There is a necessity for novel screens (related to metallobiology) to identify therapeutics effective in AD.

J Biol Chem. 2010 Sep 10;285(37):28472-80. Epub 2010 Jul 9.

Curcumin decreases amyloid-beta peptide levels by attenuating the maturation of amyloid-beta precursor protein.

Zhang C, Browne A, Child D, Tanzi RE.

Genetics and Aging Research Unit, MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129-2060, USA.

Abstract

Alzheimer disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with no cure. The pathogenesis of AD is believed to be driven primarily by amyloid-beta (Abeta), the principal component of senile plaques. Abeta is an approximately 4-kDa peptide generated via cleavage of the amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP). Curcumin is a compound in the widely used culinary spice, turmeric, which possesses potent and broad biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities, chemopreventative effects, and effects on protein trafficking. Recent in vivo studies indicate that curcumin is able to reduce Abeta-related pathology in transgenic AD mouse models via unknown molecular mechanisms. Here, we investigated the effects of curcumin on Abeta levels and APP processing in various cell lines and mouse primary cortical neurons. We show for the first time that curcumin potently lowers Abeta levels by attenuating the maturation of APP in the secretory pathway. These data provide a mechanism of action for the ability of curcumin to attenuate amyloid-beta pathology.

Neuroscience. 2010 Sep 1;169(3):1296-306. Epub 2010 Jun 9.

Curcuminoids enhance memory in an amyloid-infused rat model of Alzheimer’s disease.

Ahmed T, Enam SA, Gilani AH.

Natural Products Research Unit, Department of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, The Aga Khan University Medical College, Karachi-74800, Pakistan.

Abstract

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease. There are a limited number of therapeutic options available for the treatment of AD. Curcuminoids (a mixture of bisdemethoxycurcumin, demethoxycurcumin and curcumin) is the main chemical constituent found in turmeric, a well known curry spice, having potential in the treatment of AD. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of curcuminoid mixture and individual constituents on spatial learning and memory in an amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide-infused rat model of AD and on the expression of PSD-95, synaptophysin and camkIV. Curcuminoid mixture showed a memory-enhancing effect in rats displaying AD-like neuronal loss only at 30 mg/kg, whereas individual components were effective at 3-30 mg/kg. A shorter duration treatment with test compounds showed that the curcuminoid mixture and bisdemethoxycurcumin increased PSD-95 expression in the hippocampus at 3-30 mg/kg, with maximum effect at a lower dose (3 mg/kg) with respective values of 470.5 and 587.9%. However, after a longer duration treatment, two other compounds (demethoxycurcumin and curcumin) also increased PSD-95 to 331.7 and 226.2% respectively at 30 mg/kg. When studied for their effect on synaptophysin in the hippocampus after the longer duration treatment, the curcuminoid mixture and all three individual constituents increased synaptophysin expression. Of these, demethoxycurcumin was the most effective showing a 350.1% increase (P<0.01) at 30 mg/kg compared to the neurotoxin group. When studied for their effect on camkIV expression after longer treatment in the hippocampus, only demethoxycurcumin at 30 mg/kg increased levels to 421.2%. These compounds salvaged PSD-95, synaptophysin and camkIV expression levels in the hippocampus in the rat AD model, which suggests multiple target sites with the potential of curcuminoids in spatial memory enhancing and disease modifying in AD.

J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2010 Sep;110(9 Suppl 8):S27-36.

Investigational medications for treatment of patients with Alzheimer disease.

Potter PE.

Department of Pharmacology, Midwestern University/Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, Glendale, Arizona 85308-6813, USA. ppotte@midwestern.edu

Abstract

Development of effective treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease has been challenging. Currently approved treatments include acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine hydrochloride. To investigate treatments in development for patients with Alzheimer disease, the author conducted a review of the literature. New approaches for treatment or prevention focus on several general areas, including cholinergic receptor agonists, drugs to decrease β-amyloid and tau levels, antiinflammatory agents, drugs to increase nitric oxide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels, and substances to reduce cell death or promote cellular regeneration. The author focuses on medications currently in clinical trials. Cholinergic agents include orthostatic and allosteric muscarinic M1 agonists and nicotinic receptor agonists. Investigational agents that target β-amyloid include vaccines, antibodies, and inhibitors of β-amyloid production. Anti-inflammatory agents, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, the natural product curcumin, and the tumor necrosis factor α inhibitor etanercept, have also been studied. Some drugs currently approved for other uses may also show promise for treatment of patients with Alzheimer disease. Results of clinical trials with many of these investigational drugs have been disappointing, perhaps because of their use with patients in advanced stages of Alzheimer disease. Effective treatment may need to begin earlier-before neurodegeneration becomes severe enough for symptoms to appear.

Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel N,N’-bis-methylenedioxybenzyl-alkylenediamines as bivalent anti-Alzheimer disease ligands.

Luo W, Li YP, Tan JH, Gu LQ, Huang ZS.

J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem. 2011 Jan 21. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
21250822
[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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2.

Curcumin and Alzheimer disease: this marriage is not to be performed.

Mancuso C, Siciliano R, Barone E.

J Biol Chem. 2011 Jan 21;286(3):le3; author reply le4. No abstract available.

PMID:
21239508
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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3.

Curcumin-decorated nanoliposomes with very high affinity for amyloid-β1-42 peptide.

Mourtas S, Canovi M, Zona C, Aurilia D, Niarakis A, La Ferla B, Salmona M, Nicotra F, Gobbi M, Antimisiaris SG.

Biomaterials. 2011 Feb;32(6):1635-45. Epub 2010 Dec 4.

PMID:
21131044
[PubMed – in process]

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4.

Revisiting dietary antioxidants, neurodegeneration and dementia.

Craggs L, Kalaria RN.

Neuroreport. 2010 Nov 30. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
21127442
[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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5.

Novel drug targets based on metallobiology of Alzheimer’s disease.

Bandyopadhyay S, Huang X, Lahiri DK, Rogers JT.

Expert Opin Ther Targets. 2010 Nov;14(11):1177-97. Review.

PMID:
20942746
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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6.

Investigational medications for treatment of patients with Alzheimer disease.

Potter PE.

J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2010 Sep;110(9 Suppl 8):S27-36. Review.

PMID:
20926740
[PubMed – in process]

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7.

Differential regulation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1) and IRAK-2 by microRNA-146a and NF-kappaB in stressed human astroglial cells and in Alzheimer disease.

Cui JG, Li YY, Zhao Y, Bhattacharjee S, Lukiw WJ.

J Biol Chem. 2010 Dec 10;285(50):38951-60. Epub 2010 Oct 11.

PMID:
20937840
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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8.

Alzheimer’s disease amyloid beta converting left-handed Z-DNA back to right-handed B-form.

Geng J, Zhao C, Ren J, Qu X.

Chem Commun (Camb). 2010 Oct 14;46(38):7187-9. Epub 2010 Aug 27.

PMID:
20820525
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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9.

Specific Inhibition of NEIL-initiated repair of oxidized base damage in human genome by copper and iron: potential etiological linkage to neurodegenerative diseases.

Hegde ML, Hegde PM, Holthauzen LM, Hazra TK, Rao KS, Mitra S.

J Biol Chem. 2010 Sep 10;285(37):28812-25. Epub 2010 Jul 9.

PMID:
20622253
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Related citations

10.

Curcumin decreases amyloid-beta peptide levels by attenuating the maturation of amyloid-beta precursor protein.

Zhang C, Browne A, Child D, Tanzi RE.

J Biol Chem. 2010 Sep 10;285(37):28472-80. Epub 2010 Jul 9.

PMID:
20622013
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Related citations

11.

Curcuminoids enhance memory in an amyloid-infused rat model of Alzheimer’s disease.

Ahmed T, Enam SA, Gilani AH.

Neuroscience. 2010 Sep 1;169(3):1296-306. Epub 2010 Jun 9.

PMID:
20538041
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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12.

Inflammation, cytokines, immune response, apolipoprotein E, cholesterol, and oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease: therapeutic implications.

Candore G, Bulati M, Caruso C, Castiglia L, Colonna-Romano G, Di Bona D, Duro G, Lio D, Matranga D, Pellicanò M, Rizzo C, Scapagnini G, Vasto S.

Rejuvenation Res. 2010 Apr-Jun;13(2-3):301-13. Review.

PMID:
20462385
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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13.

Curcumin labeling of neuronal fibrillar tau inclusions in human brain samples.

Mohorko N, Repovs G, Popović M, Kovacs GG, Bresjanac M.

J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2010 Apr;69(4):405-14.

PMID:
20448485
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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14.

Why pleiotropic interventions are needed for Alzheimer’s disease.

Frautschy SA, Cole GM.

Mol Neurobiol. 2010 Jun;41(2-3):392-409. Epub 2010 May 2. Review.

PMID:
20437209
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Free PMC Article

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15.

Severe motor neuron degeneration in the spinal cord of the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

Seo JS, Leem YH, Lee KW, Kim SW, Lee JK, Han PL.

J Alzheimers Dis. 2010;21(1):263-76.

PMID:
20421695
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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16.

Oxidative stress and Alzheimer’s disease: dietary polyphenols as potential therapeutic agents.

Darvesh AS, Carroll RT, Bishayee A, Geldenhuys WJ, Van der Schyf CJ.

Expert Rev Neurother. 2010 May;10(5):729-45. Review.

PMID:
20420493
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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17.

[Development of anti-Alzheimer’s disease drug based on beta-amyloid hypothesis].

Sugimoto H.

Yakugaku Zasshi. 2010 Apr;130(4):521-6. Review. Japanese.

PMID:
20371996
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Free Article

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18.

[Neuroprotective effects of curcumin].

Li Y, Wang P.

Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi. 2009 Dec;34(24):3173-5. Review. Chinese.

PMID:
20352992
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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19.

Polyphenols and aging.

Queen BL, Tollefsbol TO.

Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Feb;3(1):34-42. Review.

PMID:
20298168
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Free PMC Article

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20.

ApoE3 mediated poly(butyl) cyanoacrylate nanoparticles containing curcumin: study of enhanced activity of curcumin against beta amyloid induced cytotoxicity using in vitro cell culture model.

Mulik RS, Mönkkönen J, Juvonen RO, Mahadik KR, Paradkar AR.

Mol Pharm. 2010 Jun 7;7(3):815-25.

PMID:
20230014
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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21.

Re-balancing of inflammation and abeta immunity as a therapeutic for Alzheimer’s disease-view from the bedside.

Fiala M.

CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets. 2010 Apr;9(2):192-6. Review.

PMID:
20205641
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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22.

Relationship between the tautomeric structures of curcumin derivatives and their Abeta-binding activities in the context of therapies for Alzheimer’s disease.

Yanagisawa D, Shirai N, Amatsubo T, Taguchi H, Hirao K, Urushitani M, Morikawa S, Inubushi T, Kato M, Kato F, Morino K, Kimura H, Nakano I, Yoshida C, Okada T, Sano M, Wada Y, Wada KN, Yamamoto A, Tooyama I.

Biomaterials. 2010 May;31(14):4179-85. Epub 2010 Feb 23.

PMID:
20181392
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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23.

Simple in vitro assays to identify amyloid-beta aggregation blockers for Alzheimer’s disease therapy.

Guo JP, Yu S, McGeer PL.

J Alzheimers Dis. 2010;19(4):1359-70.

PMID:
20061605
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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24.

Naturally occurring phytochemicals for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease.

Kim J, Lee HJ, Lee KW.

J Neurochem. 2010 Mar;112(6):1415-30. Epub 2009 Dec 26. Review.

PMID:
20050972
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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25.

Effect of curcumin on brain insulin receptors and memory functions in STZ (ICV) induced dementia model of rat.

Agrawal R, Mishra B, Tyagi E, Nath C, Shukla R.

Pharmacol Res. 2010 Mar;61(3):247-52. Epub 2009 Dec 21.

PMID:
20026275
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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26.

Phenolic compounds prevent Alzheimer’s pathology through different effects on the amyloid-beta aggregation pathway.

Hamaguchi T, Ono K, Murase A, Yamada M.

Am J Pathol. 2009 Dec;175(6):2557-65. Epub 2009 Nov 5.

PMID:
19893028
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Free PMC Article

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27.

Synthesis and biological evaluation of clicked curcumin and clicked KLVFFA conjugates as inhibitors of beta-amyloid fibril formation.

Ouberai M, Dumy P, Chierici S, Garcia J.

Bioconjug Chem. 2009 Nov;20(11):2123-32.

PMID:
19821579
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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28.

Amyloid-beta fibrillogenesis: structural insight and therapeutic intervention.

Dasilva KA, Shaw JE, McLaurin J.

Exp Neurol. 2010 Jun;223(2):311-21. Epub 2009 Sep 8. Review.

PMID:
19744483
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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29.

Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer’s disease: different molecular targets and potential therapeutic agents including curcumin.

Ray B, Lahiri DK.

Curr Opin Pharmacol. 2009 Aug;9(4):434-44. Epub 2009 Aug 3. Review.

PMID:
19656726
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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30.

Beta-amyloid oligomers induce phosphorylation of tau and inactivation of insulin receptor substrate via c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling: suppression by omega-3 fatty acids and curcumin.

Ma QL, Yang F, Rosario ER, Ubeda OJ, Beech W, Gant DJ, Chen PP, Hudspeth B, Chen C, Zhao Y, Vinters HV, Frautschy SA, Cole GM.

J Neurosci. 2009 Jul 15;29(28):9078-89.

PMID:
19605645
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Free Article

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31.

Histone acetyltransferase inhibitors and preclinical studies.

Manzo F, Tambaro FP, Mai A, Altucci L.

Expert Opin Ther Pat. 2009 Jun;19(6):761-74. Review.

PMID:
19473103
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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32.

1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 interacts with curcuminoids to stimulate amyloid-beta clearance by macrophages of Alzheimer’s disease patients.

Masoumi A, Goldenson B, Ghirmai S, Avagyan H, Zaghi J, Abel K, Zheng X, Espinosa-Jeffrey A, Mahanian M, Liu PT, Hewison M, Mizwickie M, Cashman J, Fiala M.

J Alzheimers Dis. 2009;17(3):703-17.

PMID:
19433889
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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33.

Consumption of grape seed extract prevents amyloid-beta deposition and attenuates inflammation in brain of an Alzheimer’s disease mouse.

Wang YJ, Thomas P, Zhong JH, Bi FF, Kosaraju S, Pollard A, Fenech M, Zhou XF.

Neurotox Res. 2009 Jan;15(1):3-14. Epub 2009 Feb 10.

PMID:
19384583
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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34.

Challenges associated with metal chelation therapy in Alzheimer’s disease.

Hegde ML, Bharathi P, Suram A, Venugopal C, Jagannathan R, Poddar P, Srinivas P, Sambamurti K, Rao KJ, Scancar J, Messori L, Zecca L, Zatta P.

J Alzheimers Dis. 2009;17(3):457-68. Review.

PMID:
19363258
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Free PMC Article

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35.

Amelioration of cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration by curcumin in rat model of sporadic dementia of Alzheimer’s type (SDAT).

Ishrat T, Hoda MN, Khan MB, Yousuf S, Ahmad M, Khan MM, Ahmad A, Islam F.

Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2009 Sep;19(9):636-47. Epub 2009 Mar 28.

PMID:
19329286
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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36.

Multivalent & multifunctional ligands to beta-amyloid.

Kim Y, Lee JH, Ryu J, Kim DJ.

Curr Pharm Des. 2009;15(6):637-58. Review.

PMID:
19199987
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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37.

Inhibition of Alzheimer’s amyloid toxicity with a tricyclic pyrone molecule in vitro and in vivo.

Hong HS, Rana S, Barrigan L, Shi A, Zhang Y, Zhou F, Jin LW, Hua DH.

J Neurochem. 2009 Feb;108(4):1097-1108.

PMID:
19141069
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Free PMC Article

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38.

Immune defects in Alzheimer’s disease: new medications development.

Cashman JR, Ghirmai S, Abel KJ, Fiala M.

BMC Neurosci. 2008 Dec 3;9 Suppl 2:S13. Review.

PMID:
19090986
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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39.

Use of copper and insulin-resistance to accelerate cognitive deficits and synaptic protein loss in a rat Abeta-infusion Alzheimer’s disease model.

Begum AN, Yang F, Teng E, Hu S, Jones MR, Rosario ER, Beech W, Hudspeth B, Ubeda OJ, Cole GM, Frautschy SA.

J Alzheimers Dis. 2008 Dec;15(4):625-40.

PMID:
19096161
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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40.

Grape seed polyphenols and curcumin reduce genomic instability events in a transgenic mouse model for Alzheimer’s disease.

Thomas P, Wang YJ, Zhong JH, Kosaraju S, O’Callaghan NJ, Zhou XF, Fenech M.

Mutat Res. 2009 Feb 10;661(1-2):25-34. Epub 2008 Nov 6.

PMID:
19027755
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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41.

Differential solubility of curcuminoids in serum and albumin solutions: implications for analytical and therapeutic applications.

Quitschke WW.

BMC Biotechnol. 2008 Nov 6;8:84.

PMID:
18990234
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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42.

Inhibitory effect of curcuminoids on acetylcholinesterase activity and attenuation of scopolamine-induced amnesia may explain medicinal use of turmeric in Alzheimer’s disease.

Ahmed T, Gilani AH.

Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2009 Feb;91(4):554-9. Epub 2008 Oct 1.

PMID:
18930076
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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43.

Aminostyrylbenzofuran derivatives as potent inhibitors for Abeta fibril formation.

Byun JH, Kim H, Kim Y, Mook-Jung I, Kim DJ, Lee WK, Yoo KH.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2008 Oct 15;18(20):5591-3. Epub 2008 Sep 3.

PMID:
18793854
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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44.

Alternative medicine and Alzheimer disease.

Kelley BJ, Knopman DS.

Neurologist. 2008 Sep;14(5):299-306. Review.

PMID:
18784599
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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45.

Sequestration of copper from beta-amyloid promotes selective lysis by cyclen-hybrid cleavage agents.

Wu WH, Lei P, Liu Q, Hu J, Gunn AP, Chen MS, Rui YF, Su XY, Xie ZP, Zhao YF, Bush AI, Li YM.

J Biol Chem. 2008 Nov 14;283(46):31657-64. Epub 2008 Aug 26.

PMID:
18728006
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Free Article

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46.

Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase by curcumin: Investigation by simulated molecular docking and subsequent in vitro/in vivo evaluation.

Bustanji Y, Taha MO, Almasri IM, Al-Ghussein MA, Mohammad MK, Alkhatib HS.

J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem. 2009 Jun;24(3):771-8.

PMID:
18720192
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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47.

Curcumin improves learning and memory ability and its neuroprotective mechanism in mice.

Pan R, Qiu S, Lu DX, Dong J.

Chin Med J (Engl). 2008 May 5;121(9):832-9.

PMID:
18701050
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Free Article

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48.

Alzheimer’s disease: new diagnostic and therapeutic tools.

Racchi M, Uberti D, Govoni S, Memo M, Lanni C, Vasto S, Candore G, Caruso C, Romeo L, Scapagnini G.

Immun Ageing. 2008 Aug 13;5:7.

PMID:
18700965
[PubMed]

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49.

Lipoic acid as an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.

Maczurek A, Hager K, Kenklies M, Sharman M, Martins R, Engel J, Carlson DA, Münch G.

Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2008 Oct-Nov;60(13-14):1463-70. Epub 2008 Jul 4. Review.

PMID:
18655815
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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50.

Curcumin structure-function, bioavailability, and efficacy in models of neuroinflammation and Alzheimer’s disease.

Begum AN, Jones MR, Lim GP, Morihara T, Kim P, Heath DD, Rock CL, Pruitt MA, Yang F, Hudspeth B, Hu S, Faull KF, Teter B, Cole GM, Frautschy SA.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2008 Jul;326(1):196-208. Epub 2008 Apr 16.

PMID:
18417733
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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51.

Benefits from dietary polyphenols for brain aging and Alzheimer’s disease.

Rossi L, Mazzitelli S, Arciello M, Capo CR, Rotilio G.

Neurochem Res. 2008 Dec;33(12):2390-400. Epub 2008 Apr 16. Review.

PMID:
18415677
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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52.

p21-activated kinase-aberrant activation and translocation in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

Ma QL, Yang F, Calon F, Ubeda OJ, Hansen JE, Weisbart RH, Beech W, Frautschy SA, Cole GM.

J Biol Chem. 2008 May 16;283(20):14132-43. Epub 2008 Mar 17.

PMID:
18347024
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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53.

Six-month randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, pilot clinical trial of curcumin in patients with Alzheimer disease.

Baum L, Lam CW, Cheung SK, Kwok T, Lui V, Tsoh J, Lam L, Leung V, Hui E, Ng C, Woo J, Chiu HF, Goggins WB, Zee BC, Cheng KF, Fong CY, Wong A, Mok H, Chow MS, Ho PC, Ip SP, Ho CS, Yu XW, Lai CY, Chan MH, Szeto S, Chan IH, Mok V.

J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2008 Feb;28(1):110-3. No abstract available.

PMID:
18204357
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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54.

Natural antioxidants in Alzheimer’s disease.

Mancuso C, Bates TE, Butterfield DA, Calafato S, Cornelius C, De Lorenzo A, Dinkova Kostova AT, Calabrese V.

Expert Opin Investig Drugs. 2007 Dec;16(12):1921-31. Review.

PMID:
18042001
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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55.

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Curcumin-derived pyrazoles and isoxazoles: Swiss army knives or blunt tools for Alzheimer’s disease?

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Curcumin as “Curecumin”: from kitchen to clinic.

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Innate immunity and transcription of MGAT-III and Toll-like receptors in Alzheimer’s disease patients are improved by bisdemethoxycurcumin.

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Curcumin labels amyloid pathology in vivo, disrupts existing plaques, and partially restores distorted neurites in an Alzheimer mouse model.

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Moderate coffee drinking may have many benefits.

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Spice Healer.

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Redox regulation of cellular stress response in aging and neurodegenerative disorders: role of vitagenes.

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Curcuminoids enhance amyloid-beta uptake by macrophages of Alzheimer’s disease patients.

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Molecular orbital basis for yellow curry spice curcumin’s prevention of Alzheimer’s disease.

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A potential role of the curry spice curcumin in Alzheimer’s disease.

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Curcumin inhibits formation of amyloid beta oligomers and fibrils, binds plaques, and reduces amyloid in vivo.

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Curcumin interaction with copper and iron suggests one possible mechanism of action in Alzheimer’s disease animal models.

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Nutritional antioxidants and the heme oxygenase pathway of stress tolerance: novel targets for neuroprotection in Alzheimer’s disease.

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85.

Curcumin has potent anti-amyloidogenic effects for Alzheimer’s beta-amyloid fibrils in vitro.

Ono K, Hasegawa K, Naiki H, Yamada M.

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Redox regulation of heat shock protein expression in aging and neurodegenerative disorders associated with oxidative stress: a nutritional approach.

Calabrese V, Scapagnini G, Colombrita C, Ravagna A, Pennisi G, Giuffrida Stella AM, Galli F, Butterfield DA.

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Antioxidant strategies for Alzheimer’s disease.

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Proc Nutr Soc. 2002 May;61(2):191-202. Review.

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The curry spice curcumin reduces oxidative damage and amyloid pathology in an Alzheimer transgenic mouse.

Lim GP, Chu T, Yang F, Beech W, Frautschy SA, Cole GM.

J Neurosci. 2001 Nov 1;21(21):8370-7.

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` Dr. Weeks’ Comment: I have pulled together and presented below the relevant research on curry (tumeric/curcumin) as regards the prevention and treatment of dementia in general and Alzheimer’s disease in particular. ` Why hasn’t your neurologist or geriatric doctor  or memory specialist told you and your parent(s) about curry?    Perhaps because no drug company…
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