Chrysin Targets Breast Cancer Stem Cells

Dr. Weeks’ Comments:  More great information to factor in when deciding what treatments you will choose for your cancer care.  Ask your oncologist about adding Chrysin to your protocol which can potentiate your chemotherapy as well as target your cancer STEM cells.

 

 Chrysin Reverse the Drug Resistance by Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cell Related Subpopulation

Conclusions:

1) Chrysin can reverse drug resistance of MCF-7/MX cells by targeting BCRP.

 

2) chrysin can serve as a chemotherapy sensitizer.

 

Source: Cancer Research

st cisplatin-induced colon. toxicity via amelioration of oxidative stress and apoptosis: Probable role of p38MAPK and p53.

Khan R, Khan AQ, Qamar W, Lateef A, Tahir M, Rehman MU, Ali F, Sultana S.

Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2012 Feb 1;258(3):315-29. Epub 2011 Dec 2.

 

Cisplatin, an antineoplastic drug, is widely used as a foremost therapy against numerous forms of cancer but it has pronounced adverse effects viz., nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity etc. CDDP-induced emesis and diarrhea are also marked toxicities that may be due to intestinal injury.

 

Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavone commonly found in many plants possesses multiple biological activities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of chrysin against CDDP-induced colon toxicity. The plausible mechanism of CDDP-induced colon toxicity and damage includes oxidative stress, activation of p38MAPK and p53, and colonic epithelial cell apoptosis via upregulating the expression of Bak and cleaved caspase-3.

 

Chrysin was administered to Wistar rats once daily for 14 consecutive days at the doses of 25 and 50mg/kg body weight orally in corn oil. On day 14, a single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin was given at the dose of 7.5mg/kg body weight and animals were euthanized after 24h of cisplatin injection.

 

Chrysin ameliorated CDDP-induced lipid peroxidation, xanthine oxidase activity, glutathione depletion, decrease in antioxidant (catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase) and phase-II detoxifying (glutathione-S-transferase and quinone reductase) enzyme activities.

 

Chrysin also attenuated goblet cell disintegration, expression of phospho-p38MAPK and p53, and apoptotic tissue damage which were induced by CDDP. Histological findings further supported the protective effects of chrysin against CDDP-induced colonic damage.

 

The results of the present study suggest that the protective effect of chrysin against CDDP-induced colon toxicity was related with attenuation of oxidative stress, activation of p38MAPK and p53, and apoptotic tissue damage.

 

 

Chrysin abrogates cisplatin-induced oxidative stress, p53 expression, goblet cell disintegration and apoptotic responses in the jejunum of Wistar rats.

Khan R, Sultana S  et al

 

Br J Nutr. 2012 Feb 6:1-12. [Epub ahead of print]

 

 

Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (CDDP)) is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of numerous forms of cancer, but it has pronounced adverse effects, namely nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity, neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, diarrhoea and nausea. CDDP-induced emesis and diarrhoea are also marked toxicities that may be due to intestinal injury.

 

Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavone commonly found in many plants, possesses multiple biological activities, such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

 

Chrysin ameliorated CDDP-induced lipid peroxidation, increase in xanthine oxidase activity, glutathione depletion, decrease in antioxidant (catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) and phase-II detoxifying (glutathione-S-transferase and quinone reductase) enzyme activities.

 

Chrysin attenuated CDDP-induced goblet cell disintegration, enhanced expression of p53 and apoptotic tissue damage. Histological findings further substantiated the protective effects of chrysin against CDDP-induced damage in the jejunum.

 

The results of the present study demonstrate that oxidative stress and apoptosis are closely associated with CDDP-induced toxicity and chrysin shows the protective efficacy against CDDP-induced jejunum toxicity possibly via attenuating the oxidative stress and apoptotic tissue damage.

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