Wednesday, 23 August 2017

Women feel more than men

Dr. Weeks’ Comment:  A curious discrepancy- what is the adaptive advantage of this? 

 

Ouch! Why Women Feel More Pain

Women feel more pain than men, studies have shown. New research reveals one reason why.

Women have more nerve receptors, which causes them to feel pain more intensely than men, according to a report in the October issue of the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

On average, women have 34 nerve fibers per square centimeter of facial skin. Men average just 17.

“This study has serious implications about how we treat women after surgery as well as women who experience chronic pain,” said Bradon Wilhelmi, a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and author of the study. “Because women have more nerve receptors, they may experience pain more powerfully than men, requiring different surgical techniques, treatments or medicine dosages to help manage their pain and make them feel comfortable.”

Earlier this year, separate research found that women report more pain throughout their lifetimes, in more areas of their bodies and for longer durations.

 

 

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